Kohl’s Child Safety Program
Yale-New Haven Children's Hospital Kohl's Cares

Car Seat Age Guidelines

01. Choosing

Your child under age 1 should always ride in a rear-facing car seat.

There are 3 different types of rear-facing car seats for children birth—12 months:

  1. Infant Only
  2. Convertible
  3. All-n-One and 3-in-1

The American Academy of Pediatrics advises parents to keep their children in rear-facing car seats until age 2, or until they reach the maximum height and weight for their car seat. When your child outgrows the infant-only car seat, switch to a convertible, 3-in-1 or All-in-One car seat and use it in the rear-facing position. These seats typically have weight and height limits for the rear-facing position that allow you to keep your child rear-facing longer. If a baby under 1 year old grows too tall or too heavy for an infant-only car seat, a car seat with a higher rear-facing size limit is recommended.

02. Installing & Securing

For Installation tips and instruction visit http://www.safercar.gov/parents/RightFit.htm

For Instructional videos on proper installation visit http://www.safercar.gov/parents/InstructionalVideos.htm

01. Choosing

Keep your child rear-facing as long as possible. It’s the best way to keep him or her safe. Your child should remain in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer.

There are 3 different types of forward-facing car seats for children 1-3 years:

  1. Convertible
  2. Combination
  3. All-n-One and 3-in-1

The American Academy of Pediatrics advises parents to keep their children in rear-facing car seats until age 2, or until they reach the maximum height and weight for their seat. When your child outgrows the infant-only car seat, switch to a convertible, 3-in-1 or All-in-One car seat and use it in the rear-facing position until the child reaches the weight or height limit. Continue to use your Convertible, Combination, or All-in-One and 3-in-1 car seat in the forward-facing position with a harness and tether for as long as possible. Always refer to the car seat and vehicle manuals for height and weight restrictions.

02. Installing & Securing

For Installation tips and instruction visit http://www.safercar.gov/parents/RightFit.htm

For Instructional videos on proper installation visit http://www.safercar.gov/parents/InstructionalVideos.htm

01. Choosing

Keep your child in a forward-facing car seat with a harness until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child has outgrown the weight and height limitations of your forward-facing car seat with harness, your child may be ready to ride in a booster seat, using your vehicle's lap/shoulder seat belt – never a lap belt only.

Some younger children may outgrow the weight or height limit of the forward-facing car seat with a harness but may not be ready to stay seated properly in a booster seat using the lap and shoulder belt. If this is the case, look for a car seat with a higher weight and height limit.

Remember: your child should still ride in the back seat because it’s safer there.

There are 4 different types of forward-facing car seats for children 4-7 years:

  1. Convertible
  2. Combination
  3. All-n-One and 3-in-1
  4. Booster

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends continuing to use your car seat in the forward-facing position with a harness and tether for as long as possible. Always refer to the car seat and vehicle manuals for height and weight restrictions. Children should transition from a rear-facing seat to a forward-facing seat with a harness, until they reach the maximum weight or height for that car seat.

02. Installing & Securing

For Installation tips and instruction visit http://www.safercar.gov/parents/RightFit.htm

For Instructional videos on proper installation visit http://www.safercar.gov/parents/InstructionalVideos.htm

01. Choosing

Once your child has outgrown the weight and height limitations of your forward-facing car seat with harness, your child may be ready to ride in a booster seat, using your vehicle's lap/shoulder seat belt – never a lap belt only.

Some younger children may outgrow the weight or height limit of the forward-facing car seat with a harness but may not be ready to stay seated properly in a booster seat using the lap and shoulder belt. If this is the case, look for a car seat with a higher size limit.

Remember: your child should still ride in the back seat because it’s safer there.

There are 4 different types of forward-facing car seats for children 8-12 years:

  1. Combination
  2. All-n-One and 3-in-1
  3. Booster

The American Academy of Pediatrics advises that most children will need to ride in a belt-positioning booster seat until they have reached 4 feet 9 inches tall and are between 8 and 12 years of age. Keep your child in a booster seat until he or she is big enough to fit in a seat belt properly. For a seat belt to fit properly the lap belt must lie snugly across the upper thighs, not the stomach. The shoulder belt should lie across the middle of the chest and shoulder, not near the neck or face.

02. Installing & Securing

For Installation tips and instruction visit http://www.safercar.gov/parents/RightFit.htm

For Instructional videos on proper installation visit http://www.safercar.gov/parents/InstructionalVideos.htm

Always
Remember To

Check individual car seat manuals for weight and height requirements

Check individual vehicles for car seat installation requirements and guidelines

Age Guidelines

Section Icon Birth - 12 Months

01. Choosing

Your child under age 1 should always ride in a rear-facing car seat.

There are 3 different types of rear-facing car seats for children birth—12 months:

  1. Infant-only
  2. Convertible
  3. All-in-One and 3-in-1

The American Academy of Pediatrics advises parents to keep their toddlers in rear-facing car seats until age 2, or until they reach the maximum height and weight for their car seat. When your child outgrows the infant-only car seat, switch to a convertible, 3-in-1 or All-in-One car seat and use it in the rear-facing position. These seats typically have weight and height limits for the rear-facing position that allow you to keep your child rear-facing longer. If a baby under 1 year old grows too tall or too heavy for an infant-only car seat, a car seat with a higher rear-facing size limit is recommended.

02. Installing & Securing

For Installation tips and instruction click here

For Instructional videos on proper installation visit click here

Section Icon 1 - 3 Years

01. Choosing

Keep your child rear-facing as long as possible. It’s the best way to keep him or her safe. Your child should remain in a rear-facing car seat until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer.

There are 3 different types of forward-facing car seats for children 1-3 years:

  1. Convertible
  2. Combination
  3. All-in-One and 3-in-1

The American Academy of Pediatrics advises parents to keep their children in rear-facing car seats until age 2, or until they reach the maximum height and weight for their seat. When your child outgrows the infant-only car seat, switch to a convertible, 3-in-1 or All-in-One car seat and use it in the rear-facing position until the child reaches the weight or height limit. Continue to use your Convertible, Combination, or All-in-One and 3-in-1 car seat in the forward-facing position with a harness and tether for as long as possible. Always refer to the car seat and vehicle manuals for height and weight restrictions.

02. Installing & Securing

For Installation tips and instruction click here

For Instructional videos on proper installation visit click here

Section Icon 4 - 7 Years

01. Choosing

Keep your child in a forward-facing car seat with a harness until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Once your child has outgrown the weight and height limitations of your forward-facing car seat with harness, your child may be ready to ride in a booster seat, using your vehicle's lap/shoulder seat belt – never a lap belt only.

Some younger children may outgrow the weight or height limit of the forward-facing car seat with a harness but may not be ready to stay seated properly in a booster seat using the lap and shoulder belt. If this is the case, look for a car seat with a higher weight and height limit.

Remember: your child should still ride in the back seat because it’s safer there.

There are 4 different types of forward-facing car seats for children 4-7 years:

  1. Convertible
  2. Combination
  3. All-in-One and 3-in-1
  4. Booster

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends continuing to use your car seat in the forward-facing position with a harness and tether for as long as possible. Always refer to the car seat and vehicle manuals for height and weight restrictions. Children should transition from a rear-facing seat to a forward-facing seat with a harness, until they reach the maximum weight or height for that car seat.

02. Installing & Securing

For Installation tips and instruction click here

For Instructional videos on proper installation visit click here

Section Icon 8 - 12 Years

01. Choosing

Once your child has outgrown the weight and height limitations of your forward-facing car seat with harness, your child may be ready to ride in a booster seat, using your vehicle's lap/shoulder seat belt – never a lap belt only.

Some younger children may outgrow the weight or height limit of the forward-facing car seat with a harness but may not be ready to stay seated properly in a booster seat using the lap and shoulder belt. If this is the case, look for a car seat with a higher size limit.

Remember: your child should still ride in the back seat because it’s safer there.

There are 3 different types of forward-facing car seats for children 4-7 years:

  1. Combination
  2. All-in-One and 3-in-1
  3. Booster

The American Academy of Pediatrics advises that most children will need to ride in a belt-positioning booster seat until they have reached 4 feet 9 inches tall and are between 8 and 12 years of age. Keep your child in a booster seat until he or she is big enough to fit in a seat belt properly. For a seat belt to fit properly the lap belt must lie snugly across the upper thighs, not the stomach. The shoulder belt should lie across the middle of the chest and shoulder, not near the neck or face.

02. Installing & Securing

For Installation tips and instruction click here

For Instructional videos on proper installation visit click here

Always Remember